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R-134A Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart - R-134A is an inert gas also known as Tetrafluoroethane and is used in air conditioner systems. R134A is used as a chemical refrigerant in automotive and domestic use air conditioners such as chilled water systems in both commercial markets and industrial markets. You are very familiar with R134A if you are either an automotive mechanic or a chiller mechanic. R-134A uses the names Tetrafluoroethane, Genetron, or Puron among other names depending on the manufacturer. The pressure temperature chart represents the average pressure-temperature relationship of refrigerant R-134A.

R-134A Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

PSIGR-134A TemperaturePSIGR-134A Temperature
(10)-317472
(8)-277674
(6)-247875
(4)-218076
(2)-188277
0-158478
2-108681
4-58883
6-19082
839283
1079484
12109685
14139886
161610087
181910590
202211093
222511596
242712098
2630125100
2832130102
3035135105
3237140107
3439145109
3641150112
3843155114
4045160116
4247165118
4449170120
4651175121
4852180123
5054185125
5256190127
5658195129
5860200131
6062210134
6264220137
6465230141
6666240143
6868250147
7069260149
7271270152

This table represents a pressure-temperature chart for R134A which is a refrigerant frequently used in automobile air conditioning and for larger chilled water systems in commercial and industrial chilled water systems. R-134A is an HFC or hydrofluorocarbon refrigerant and as noted is used for automotive air conditioning where it replaced the CFC refrigerant R-12. Always follow manufacturers charging instructions when charging any chiller or auto air conditioner system with R-134A.

Whether purchasing R134A for HVAC or Automotive use a license is required under EPA Clean Air Act regulations. R-134A was introduced in the 90’s as a replacement for R-12 which was banned from manufacture and use by the Clean Air Act in the 90’s. Because R-134A is considered to have GWP or Global Warming Potential it is required to be recovered from HVAC Systems rather than released into the atmosphere.

Refrigerant Leaks and Corrective Action (Via the EPA Website) - R-134A Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

The leak repair requirements, promulgated under Section 608 of the Clean Air Act, require that when an owner or operator of an appliance that normally contains a refrigerant charge of more than 50 pounds discovers that refrigerant is leaking at a rate that would exceed the applicable trigger rate during a 12-month period, the owner or operator must take corrective action.

Trigger Rates – R-134A Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

For all appliances that have a refrigerant charge of more than 50 pounds, the following leak rates for a 12-month period are applicable:

Appliance Type Trigger Leak Rate
Commercial refrigeration 35%
Industrial process refrigeration 35%
Comfort cooling 15%
All other appliances 15%

In general, owners or operators must either repair leaks within thirty days from the date the leak was discovered, or develop a dated retrofit/retirement plan within thirty days and complete actions under that plan within one year from the plan’s date. However, for industrial process refrigeration equipment and some federally-owned chillers, additional time may be available.

An additional resource for R134A Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart can be found here.

R-134A Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

R-134A Refrigerant Pressure Temperature Chart

To learn more about heating systems and HVAC use this resource.

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