Tag Archives: TXV

What is a Metering Device – Refrigeration Components

What is a Metering Device - TXV- Thermostatic Expansion Valve

TXV Metering Device for a Heat Pump

What is a Metering Device – Depending on the type of HVAC air conditioning or heat pump system it is and the efficiency range of the system will depend on the type of metering device the system has installed by the HVAC manufacturer of the air conditioner or heat pump system. Lower efficiency HVAC air conditioner and heat pump models have fixed orifice types while higher efficiency systems have thermostatic expansion valves installed in the HVAC air conditioner or heat pump system. The thermostatic expansion valve is far more complex than the fixed orifice metering device as the thermostatic expansion valve metering device modulates the refrigerant flow based on the temperature of the refrigerant temperature in the evaporator coil. This allows a specific amount of refrigerant, based on demand, to be metered into the evaporator coil while the fixed orifice metering device allows the same amount of refrigerant to enter the enter the coil no matter the conditions or the demand. As the liquid refrigerant enters the metering device it changes temperature and pressure. A partial amount of the liquid refrigerant flashes into a refrigerant gas or vapor as it leaves the metering device and enters the evaporator coil.

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TXV or Thermostatic Expansion Valve | Refrigeration for HVAC

TXV or Thermostatic Expansion Valve

TXV or Thermostatic Expansion Valve

TXV or Thermostatic Expansion Valve

TXV or Thermostatic Expansion Valve are used in air conditioners and heat pumps to meter refrigerant. The TXV or Thermostatic Expansion Valve is preferred over other refrigeration metering devices because it only allows a specified amount of refrigerant to flow based on demand. Any type of refrigeration metering device creates a pressure drop in the refrigerant and with a pressure drop of the refrigerant a temperature drop also occurs. This temperature is necessary to drop the refrigerant down to temperature lower than ambient temperatures inside the structure being cooled. This allows the refrigerant to absorb the heat contained in the air passing over the evaporator coil.

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2014